examples:residential_buildings:multi-family_buildings:central_europe:the_world_s_first_passive_house_darmstadt-kranichstein_germany

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examples:residential_buildings:multi-family_buildings:central_europe:the_world_s_first_passive_house_darmstadt-kranichstein_germany [2020/09/16 21:36]
wfeist [From the low-energy house to the Passive House]
examples:residential_buildings:multi-family_buildings:central_europe:the_world_s_first_passive_house_darmstadt-kranichstein_germany [2020/09/16 21:37] (current)
wfeist
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 |{{ :​picopen:​fenster_ph_groesse.png?​500 }}| |{{ :​picopen:​fenster_ph_groesse.png?​500 }}|
-|//**__Fig. 1 - Simulation results at the beginning:​__ here is a calculation of the dependen-\\ ce of the heating demand on the size of the glazed south-facing window areas in\\ a Passive House with different glazing qualities (from [[examples:​residential_buildings:​multi-family_buildings:​central_europe:​selection_of_multi-family_passive_house_buildings_in_germany#​Literature|[Feist 1993]]]). It’s clear that\\ triple-pane low-e glazing is necessary for favourable energy balances in Central \\ Europe (see [[Planning:​thermal_protection:​windows:​Types of glazing and their specific values]] ​ {{:​picopen:​members_only.png?​20|}}) (bottom curve). Dr. Ortmanns,\\ with VEGLA in Aachen at that time, helped us to obtain this glazing for the first buil-\\ ding project, the Passive House in Darmstadt-Kranichstein. Since then, this type\\ of glazing has become commonly available on the market:\\ see [[Planning:​thermal_protection:​windows:​Types of glazing and their specific values]] ​ {{:​picopen:​members_only.png?​20|}}.**//​|\\+|//**__Fig. 1 - Simulation results at the beginning:​__ here is a calculation of the dependen-\\ ce of the heating demand on the size of the glazed south-facing window areas in\\ a Passive House with different glazing qualities (from [[examples:​residential_buildings:​multi-family_buildings:​central_europe:​selection_of_multi-family_passive_house_buildings_in_germany#​Literature|[Feist 1993] ]]). It’s clear that\\ triple-pane low-e glazing is necessary for favourable energy balances in Central \\ Europe (see [[Planning:​thermal_protection:​windows:​Types of glazing and their specific values]] ​ {{:​picopen:​members_only.png?​20|}}) (bottom curve). Dr. Ortmanns,\\ with VEGLA in Aachen at that time, helped us to obtain this glazing for the first buil-\\ ding project, the Passive House in Darmstadt-Kranichstein. Since then, this type\\ of glazing has become commonly available on the market:\\ see [[Planning:​thermal_protection:​windows:​Types of glazing and their specific values]] ​ {{:​picopen:​members_only.png?​20|}}.**//​|\\
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 **It was quickly realised that energy optimisation for buildings should not be limited solely to heating energy; in fact, all household energy consumption had to be minimised.** Otherwise it would be possible to reduce the heating energy requirement to "​zero"​ by using inefficient electrical devices, for example, which create high internal gains. How high the available internal heat gains really are, was disputed even back then – with the completed Passive House, carefully measured results finally became available, namely around 2 W/m² [[examples:​residential_buildings:​multi-family_buildings:​central_europe:​selection_of_multi-family_passive_house_buildings_in_germany#​Literature|[AkkP 5] ]]. In spite of this, even after standardisation,​ calculations are still carried out using values that are far too optimistic((This is one of the reasons of the often "​bemoaned"​ so called performance gap, which is in fact by no way a performance gap, but a difference which results from self-deception:​ For example by asuming unrealistic high internal heat gains.)) ​ (over 5 W/m²).\\ **It was quickly realised that energy optimisation for buildings should not be limited solely to heating energy; in fact, all household energy consumption had to be minimised.** Otherwise it would be possible to reduce the heating energy requirement to "​zero"​ by using inefficient electrical devices, for example, which create high internal gains. How high the available internal heat gains really are, was disputed even back then – with the completed Passive House, carefully measured results finally became available, namely around 2 W/m² [[examples:​residential_buildings:​multi-family_buildings:​central_europe:​selection_of_multi-family_passive_house_buildings_in_germany#​Literature|[AkkP 5] ]]. In spite of this, even after standardisation,​ calculations are still carried out using values that are far too optimistic((This is one of the reasons of the often "​bemoaned"​ so called performance gap, which is in fact by no way a performance gap, but a difference which results from self-deception:​ For example by asuming unrealistic high internal heat gains.)) ​ (over 5 W/m²).\\
examples/residential_buildings/multi-family_buildings/central_europe/the_world_s_first_passive_house_darmstadt-kranichstein_germany.txt · Last modified: 2020/09/16 21:37 by wfeist