basics:primary_energy_renewable

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basics:primary_energy_renewable [2020/01/30 13:12]
cblagojevic created
basics:primary_energy_renewable [2020/01/30 14:31] (current)
alang
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-====== ​Effieciency ​of household appliances and their impact on the primary energy demand of residential buildings ======+====== ​Efficiency ​of household appliances and their impact on the primary energy demand of residential buildings ======
  
 Once a project is designed as a Passive House, the energy demand from heating and cooling is drastically reduced. Then, the contribution of domestic hot water generation and household appliances becomes more relevant for the total primary energy demand of the building. At a household level, the energy demand from appliances (white goods) can be the largest share [Ottinger 2017]. It is then important to look at the efficiency of household appliances and how they can contribute to reducing the total primary energy use of a building. Even more so where projects are seeking to achieve the renewable primary energy requirements for Passive House Plus and Premium. Once a project is designed as a Passive House, the energy demand from heating and cooling is drastically reduced. Then, the contribution of domestic hot water generation and household appliances becomes more relevant for the total primary energy demand of the building. At a household level, the energy demand from appliances (white goods) can be the largest share [Ottinger 2017]. It is then important to look at the efficiency of household appliances and how they can contribute to reducing the total primary energy use of a building. Even more so where projects are seeking to achieve the renewable primary energy requirements for Passive House Plus and Premium.
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 Table 1 includes the summary of the collected and normalized values per appliance. It must be noted that an exhaustive search of all available products in a given market was not carried out. As such, the values presented here cannot be considered statistically significant,​ and the authors make no claims that the products definitely represent the best available products in the different markets. Table 1 includes the summary of the collected and normalized values per appliance. It must be noted that an exhaustive search of all available products in a given market was not carried out. As such, the values presented here cannot be considered statistically significant,​ and the authors make no claims that the products definitely represent the best available products in the different markets.
  
-[{{ :​picopen:​energy_user_per.png?​direct&​400 |**Table 1** Energy demand per appliance in the different regions. \\ Cells in gray include the normalized values (for input in PHPP).}}]+[{{ :​picopen:​energy_user_per.png?​direct&​400 |**Table 1** Energy demand per appliance in the different regions. \\ Cells in grey include the normalized values (for input in PHPP).}}]
  
 As Table 1 shows, there is not a clear tendency on whether appliances are more efficient in one region or the other. But, when looking at their contribution to the energy demand of the building, given the same utilization pattern, appliances available in Europe result in a lower energy demand. Figure 2 includes the final energy demand from household appliances for different dwelling sizes and with the values for the different regions and efficiencies. It must be noted that the average products available in both the European and North American markets already result in a lower energy demand than the one calculated with the standard values in PHPP. However, the total energy demand from the “best available” appliances in the North American market is still higher than that of the “good” appliances from Europe. As Table 1 shows, there is not a clear tendency on whether appliances are more efficient in one region or the other. But, when looking at their contribution to the energy demand of the building, given the same utilization pattern, appliances available in Europe result in a lower energy demand. Figure 2 includes the final energy demand from household appliances for different dwelling sizes and with the values for the different regions and efficiencies. It must be noted that the average products available in both the European and North American markets already result in a lower energy demand than the one calculated with the standard values in PHPP. However, the total energy demand from the “best available” appliances in the North American market is still higher than that of the “good” appliances from Europe.
basics/primary_energy_renewable.txt · Last modified: 2020/01/30 14:31 by alang