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basics:energy_and_ecology:embodied_energy_and_the_passive_house_standard

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basics:energy_and_ecology:embodied_energy_and_the_passive_house_standard [2018/06/18 11:57]
cblagojevic [See also]
basics:energy_and_ecology:embodied_energy_and_the_passive_house_standard [2019/02/28 10:00] (current)
cblagojevic
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 A full comparison must take place over the entire life cycle period. In the work mentioned, the **cumulated primary energy demand (CED) was compared over an 80-year usage period for various building standards** (**Fig.1**). A full comparison must take place over the entire life cycle period. In the work mentioned, the **cumulated primary energy demand (CED) was compared over an 80-year usage period for various building standards** (**Fig.1**).
   * For poorly insulated buildings, the energy required for their construction accounts for only about 5% in comparison with the energy required in the form of natural gas and for domestic electricity.   * For poorly insulated buildings, the energy required for their construction accounts for only about 5% in comparison with the energy required in the form of natural gas and for domestic electricity.
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   * The importance of electricity and natural gas consumption during the period of use in the low-energy house is about the same with 45% for each. Improvement is possible mainly through the efficient use of electricity.   * The importance of electricity and natural gas consumption during the period of use in the low-energy house is about the same with 45% for each. Improvement is possible mainly through the efficient use of electricity.
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   * The heating consumption of the Passive House is so small due to the excellent thermal protection that there is no need for a separate heating system. The energy required for the construction of a new Passive House can thus be even less than that of ordinary new buildings.   * The heating consumption of the Passive House is so small due to the excellent thermal protection that there is no need for a separate heating system. The energy required for the construction of a new Passive House can thus be even less than that of ordinary new buildings.
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   * The cumulated primary energy demand for energy-autarchic houses is higher than that for Passive Houses, due to the large amount of primary energy required for the production and renewal of complex technical systems [[basics:​energy_and_ecology:​embodied_energy_and_the_passive_house_standard#​Literature|[Röhm 1993] ]].\\   * The cumulated primary energy demand for energy-autarchic houses is higher than that for Passive Houses, due to the large amount of primary energy required for the production and renewal of complex technical systems [[basics:​energy_and_ecology:​embodied_energy_and_the_passive_house_standard#​Literature|[Röhm 1993] ]].\\
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 **Fig.2** shows the **temporal course of the cumulated primary energy demand (CED) for 3 variants over an 80-year usage period**. **Fig.2** shows the **temporal course of the cumulated primary energy demand (CED) for 3 variants over an 80-year usage period**.
   * The “starting points“ of the German thermal protection regulations (MEE 1171 kWh/m²), low-energy house (1220 kWh/m²) and the Passive House (1391 kWh/m²) are very close together.   * The “starting points“ of the German thermal protection regulations (MEE 1171 kWh/m²), low-energy house (1220 kWh/m²) and the Passive House (1391 kWh/m²) are very close together.
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   * After two years the cumulated energy demand of the reference house is already greater than that of the low-energy house and that of the Passive House.   * After two years the cumulated energy demand of the reference house is already greater than that of the low-energy house and that of the Passive House.
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   * The primary energy levels finally develop away from each other proportional to the different consumptions during the period of use; the expenditure for the renewal of solar collectors and ventilation systems in the Passive House can also be seen (peaks every 20 years or every 30 years respectively).   * The primary energy levels finally develop away from each other proportional to the different consumptions during the period of use; the expenditure for the renewal of solar collectors and ventilation systems in the Passive House can also be seen (peaks every 20 years or every 30 years respectively).
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   * It can be seen clearly that the ecological benefit in the transition from the low-energy house to the Passive House is much greater than it is in the transition from the reference house based on the regulations to the low-energy house.\\   * It can be seen clearly that the ecological benefit in the transition from the low-energy house to the Passive House is much greater than it is in the transition from the reference house based on the regulations to the low-energy house.\\
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 **Fig. 3**.shows how the manufacturing energy demand changes when only the insulation thickness is varied (the rest of the data is the same as for the Passive House).\\ ​ **Fig. 3**.shows how the manufacturing energy demand changes when only the insulation thickness is varied (the rest of the data is the same as for the Passive House).\\ ​
   * It is interesting that the MED initially decreases for insulation thicknesses of up to 5 cm, although the manufacture of insulation requires energy. The reason for this is that due to the reduced maximum heat load, the heating surfaces (steel) are now smaller.   * It is interesting that the MED initially decreases for insulation thicknesses of up to 5 cm, although the manufacture of insulation requires energy. The reason for this is that due to the reduced maximum heat load, the heating surfaces (steel) are now smaller.
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   * For this house, the Passive House Standard can be achieved with an insulation thickness of about 23 cm.  The heat distribution system and the remaining heating surfaces can be dispensed with, resulting in a peak in the curve.   * For this house, the Passive House Standard can be achieved with an insulation thickness of about 23 cm.  The heat distribution system and the remaining heating surfaces can be dispensed with, resulting in a peak in the curve.
  
basics/energy_and_ecology/embodied_energy_and_the_passive_house_standard.txt · Last modified: 2019/02/28 10:00 by cblagojevic